Thrums! 
I hate thrums.

Thrums! 

I hate thrums.



The problem with crafting gifts for other people is that if I post pictures anywhere, it will ruin the surprise.

Spoilers!

On the left is a shawl. It’s vaguely off-white with some pinkish beads.

On the right is the top of a quilt. It’s for someone who hasn’t been conceived yet.

Are my secrets still safe? 


What is this? Forty strips of awesome batik from batiks.com. Originally I set myself up to be disappointed. I put a lot of effort into picking fabrics that go well together in my quilts, so ordering a jelly roll is putting a lot of faith in someone else’s hands. However, I’m not only so impressed with the great service that Batiks Etcetera provided (super quick shipping! perfect 2.5” strips!), I’m deeply in love with all of the fabrics that they sent. There isn’t a single batik that didn’t make me gasp as I unrolled the bunch. That’s 40 gasps. Batiks.com, thank you so much!

Now I just have to sew it into a queen-sized quilt (in addition to all of my other crafting projects, working full time and going back to school) before the end of September.


This isn’t newly completed, but I never had a photo of the completed quilt. It was recently given back to me so I could install a hanging sleeve, and is now hanging up in my brother’s house

This isn’t newly completed, but I never had a photo of the completed quilt. It was recently given back to me so I could install a hanging sleeve, and is now hanging up in my brother’s house


I recently finished spinning two skeins yarn on my Brockert drop spindle. I initially thought the spindle was a little bit of a splurge, but it spins so fast and evenly, and has made a big improvement in my spinning skill. The dark green is 100 grams of dyed wool that I got from Little Barn (http://www.littlebarninc.com/) at Rhinebeck last Fall. The natural yarn is a bamboo and alpaca blend from Hubbert Farms (http://hubbertfarms.ca/) with the perfect blend of sheen, drape and soft hand. Both spun up like a dream, but I have a special place in my spinning heart for the alpacas at Hubbert Farms. I’ve spun from three different lots of their fiber, and each experience is like spinning with clouds.

The alpaca/bamboo blend is already on its way to becoming a gift for a new member of my family. The centerpiece is taken from Sivia Harding’s Tibetan Clouds stole (http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/tibetan-clouds-beaded-stole), and the shawl will be beaded with silver and pink/iridescent glass beads. 


Thanks, Rita!

Thanks, Rita!



Spinning and quilting update:

I’m up to 106 modules for the quilt, and I’m a little sick of it. It’s not color fatigue, and in fact the flowers that I dislike the most are the least saturated. I still have at least 40 left to go, so hopefully I’ll like it better by the time it needs to be sewn together.

The skein on the top left is shetland from Hopeful Shetlands (http://from-hopeful.blogspot.com/), but it’s much softer than shetland usually is. My favorite hat is made out of yarn I spun last year from their herd. The top right and bottom left are both merino from Studioloo (http://www.studioloo.com/). The greyish-purple was from mill ends (ends of fiber from spinning commerical yarn with lots of unusual forms), and was surprisingly nice to spin on my 34g nurse shark top whorl from Spinning with Sharks (http://spinningwithsharks.ca/). I love the colors of the green, but I think I’ve come to the conclusion that I’m not a batt spinner. I don’t like making rolags, and I don’t like stripping it. The blue streaks in that yarn are so bizarre, they almost feel like a synthetic. They were slippery, but in a slick sort of way, not an alpaca sort of way. The last yarn in the bottom right is merino/seacell from Lofty Fibres (http://loftyfibres.blogspot.com/), spun from the fold.


Batik flower garden quilt—79 modules complete as of Sept 10, 2011